In addition to being indispensable to human metabolism, sleep carries certain magic, especially through dreams. The Amerindians had strong beliefs about dreams and this is well demonstrated by the creation of dream catchers. This rainbow dream catcher differs from the lace white dream catcher model among others because of its multiple colors. But on the other hand, it is as much in line with Indian beliefs as it is with interior design purposes.

The myth of the dream catcher in the Amerindian culture

Objects such as the rainbow dream catcher are originally a creation of the Native Americans. In particular, there are two different legends about the birth of the very first dream catcher. These are those that emerged from the Lakota and Ojibwe tribes. Among the Lakota Native Americans, dream catchers were born from the vision of the spiritual leader of that tribe. In this vision, the spiritual leader or elder of the Lakota had a conversation with the spider Iktomi in 'sacred language'. Iktomi is said to have made the first dream catcher while discussing the cycle of life with the spiritual leader. To do this, he wove a web on the willow hoop worn by the elder. On this hoop were horsehair, beads, and offerings. Iktomi then gave the cloth to the elder and told him to use it for his people. One of the purposes of the cloth was to help the Lakota achieve their goals. It would also allow them to make good use of their ideas, dreams, and visions. One of the things the web would do is filter out the good ideas and imprison the bad ones. The Ojibwe's version of the myth of dream catchers is not very different from that of the Lakota. Indeed, their legend also describes the dream catcher as a gift from a higher entity. More precisely, the dreamcatcher of the Ojibwe tradition is said to be a gift from Asibikaashi, the 'spider woman'. The latter is considered by the Ojibwe to be their great protector. She protects all the people of the tribe but focuses especially on newborns. Asibikaashi was able to protect the Ojibwe above all if they were in their ancestral homeland. Things became more difficult for her, however, when the Ojibwe began to conquer other territories in North America. Abisibikaashi then had to ask for help from the Ojibwe tribe itself. She especially asked the women and grandmothers of that tribe to make protective cloth similar to hers. These magical canvases were the first dream catcher. Ojibwe dream catchers were made from purely natural materials. The hoops were made from willow branches because this wood symbolized love in their culture. The cords were made from plant fibers. The dream catcher was also decorated with elements characteristic of Native American rituals such as feathers, beads and animal bones. Dream catchers were also made especially for the benefit of a given person. Concepts such as our colorful Oneida Dreamcatcher and Rainbow Dream catcher were hung on the cradles of infants. This way, they were in a good position to let good dreams pass and suppress nightmares. The good dreams passed through the hole of the dream catcher while the nightmares were caught in the web. Trapped in the canvas, bad dreams could be burned with daylight.

Rainbow multicolored phenomenon enriched with magic

Rainbows, unlike other colors used as on this Wakiza purple Wakiza dream catcher, always surprise when you observe them for the first time. This combination of various colors in a vaulted arch inspires fantasy to many people. Others even see it as a kind of connection to a magical world that is beyond their understanding. For science, rainbows are an optical phenomenon like any other. This would include the reflection of the spectrum of white light. This would explain the presence of the seven colors of the rainbow. These are: red, orange, yellow, green, blue (the same shade of blue as on the blue wapi catcher), indigo and violet. This association, however, makes more sense than the only spectrum of light in other cultures. Northern mythology tells the story of a rainbow bridge that would link the Bifrost to Asgard. The Irish also believed that the rainbow was a bridge between the human and leprechaun worlds. This same belief held that leprechauns would leave their pots of gold at the foot of the rainbows. The seven colors of the rainbow are also perceived by the Indians as those of the Chakra. Our rainbow dream catcher can be an allegory of all these beliefs and more. The limit of its meaning can only be limited by the scope of your imagination. The multitude of colors of this rainbow dream catcher is also very inspiring on a decorative level.

A rainbow dream catcher that stays in the craftsmanship of the dream catcher.

Dream catchers today tend to proliferate all over the world and in very varied forms. There are dream catchers as such, such as the rainbow dream catcher. There are also derivative forms such as dream catcher tattoos, dream catcher jewelry, clothing effects, and even brownstone dream catcher models. Westerners are the most conquered by this concept, especially with the popularity of the New Wave movement. The growing commercialization around dream catchers is so great that it tends to make people forget the true meaning of such objects. In particular, the tradition of handcrafted dream catchers is being put aside in favor of large-scale production with specialized devices. However, some of the dream catchers on sale still retain the spirit of traditional craftsmanship. Our rainbow dream catcher is a good example of this and boasts a powerful symbolism.

A dream catcher in many colors

The canvas is woven in the shape of a ten-pointed star with a fuchsia bead in the middle. The multiple colors of this rainbow dream catcher are also found in all its elements. This includes the expanded down feathers, the beads and the frame covering.

Dream Catcher
Rainbow

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    In addition to being indispensable to human metabolism, sleep carries certain magic, especially through dreams. The Amerindians had strong beliefs about dreams and this is well demonstrated by the creation of dream catchers. This rainbow dream catcher differs from the lace white dream catcher model among others because of its multiple colors. But on the other hand, it is as much in line with Indian beliefs as it is with interior design purposes.

    The myth of the dream catcher in the Amerindian culture

    Objects such as the rainbow dream catcher are originally a creation of the Native Americans. In particular, there are two different legends about the birth of the very first dream catcher. These are those that emerged from the Lakota and Ojibwe tribes. Among the Lakota Native Americans, dream catchers were born from the vision of the spiritual leader of that tribe. In this vision, the spiritual leader or elder of the Lakota had a conversation with the spider Iktomi in 'sacred language'. Iktomi is said to have made the first dream catcher while discussing the cycle of life with the spiritual leader. To do this, he wove a web on the willow hoop worn by the elder. On this hoop were horsehair, beads, and offerings. Iktomi then gave the cloth to the elder and told him to use it for his people. One of the purposes of the cloth was to help the Lakota achieve their goals. It would also allow them to make good use of their ideas, dreams, and visions. One of the things the web would do is filter out the good ideas and imprison the bad ones. The Ojibwe's version of the myth of dream catchers is not very different from that of the Lakota. Indeed, their legend also describes the dream catcher as a gift from a higher entity. More precisely, the dreamcatcher of the Ojibwe tradition is said to be a gift from Asibikaashi, the 'spider woman'. The latter is considered by the Ojibwe to be their great protector. She protects all the people of the tribe but focuses especially on newborns. Asibikaashi was able to protect the Ojibwe above all if they were in their ancestral homeland. Things became more difficult for her, however, when the Ojibwe began to conquer other territories in North America. Abisibikaashi then had to ask for help from the Ojibwe tribe itself. She especially asked the women and grandmothers of that tribe to make protective cloth similar to hers. These magical canvases were the first dream catcher. Ojibwe dream catchers were made from purely natural materials. The hoops were made from willow branches because this wood symbolized love in their culture. The cords were made from plant fibers. The dream catcher was also decorated with elements characteristic of Native American rituals such as feathers, beads and animal bones. Dream catchers were also made especially for the benefit of a given person. Concepts such as our colorful Oneida Dreamcatcher and Rainbow Dream catcher were hung on the cradles of infants. This way, they were in a good position to let good dreams pass and suppress nightmares. The good dreams passed through the hole of the dream catcher while the nightmares were caught in the web. Trapped in the canvas, bad dreams could be burned with daylight.

    Rainbow multicolored phenomenon enriched with magic

    Rainbows, unlike other colors used as on this Wakiza purple Wakiza dream catcher, always surprise when you observe them for the first time. This combination of various colors in a vaulted arch inspires fantasy to many people. Others even see it as a kind of connection to a magical world that is beyond their understanding. For science, rainbows are an optical phenomenon like any other. This would include the reflection of the spectrum of white light. This would explain the presence of the seven colors of the rainbow. These are: red, orange, yellow, green, blue (the same shade of blue as on the blue wapi catcher), indigo and violet. This association, however, makes more sense than the only spectrum of light in other cultures. Northern mythology tells the story of a rainbow bridge that would link the Bifrost to Asgard. The Irish also believed that the rainbow was a bridge between the human and leprechaun worlds. This same belief held that leprechauns would leave their pots of gold at the foot of the rainbows. The seven colors of the rainbow are also perceived by the Indians as those of the Chakra. Our rainbow dream catcher can be an allegory of all these beliefs and more. The limit of its meaning can only be limited by the scope of your imagination. The multitude of colors of this rainbow dream catcher is also very inspiring on a decorative level.

    A rainbow dream catcher that stays in the craftsmanship of the dream catcher.

    Dream catchers today tend to proliferate all over the world and in very varied forms. There are dream catchers as such, such as the rainbow dream catcher. There are also derivative forms such as dream catcher tattoos, dream catcher jewelry, clothing effects, and even brownstone dream catcher models. Westerners are the most conquered by this concept, especially with the popularity of the New Wave movement. The growing commercialization around dream catchers is so great that it tends to make people forget the true meaning of such objects. In particular, the tradition of handcrafted dream catchers is being put aside in favor of large-scale production with specialized devices. However, some of the dream catchers on sale still retain the spirit of traditional craftsmanship. Our rainbow dream catcher is a good example of this and boasts a powerful symbolism.

    A dream catcher in many colors

    The canvas is woven in the shape of a ten-pointed star with a fuchsia bead in the middle. The multiple colors of this rainbow dream catcher are also found in all its elements. This includes the expanded down feathers, the beads and the frame covering.