The dreamcatchers are as much fetish objects as they are decorative items. Invented by the Amerindians even before the arrival of the settlers, the dreamcatcher is today a worldwide success, especially among Westerners.

Using a dream catcher to dream usefully

Native Americans are fascinating in their culture. Their belief is based on the power of nature and the cycle of life. People outside their milieu would see it as a form of mysticism and magic. However, these North American natives saw it as a true way of life. In particular, the Native American tribes established beliefs about concepts that were seemingly insignificant to many people. One of the first and most important of these is that of dreams. The interest that the Amerindians had in dreams went beyond fascination. These indigenous peoples of America based their entire existence concretely around dreams. They looked for guidance in their daily lives in order to carry out a variety of tasks. These included hunting, farming, exploring the land and even waging war. Dreams in the reasoning of the Native American tribes thus had a value of utility. Anyone could dream and make useful interpretations of their daily life. The most difficult decisions, however, required more enlightened dreams, especially those of the tribe's spiritual leader. The Native Americans were so eager to find answers in their dreams that they could use drastic means to do so. Many of them used psychotropic drugs to make sure they got the visions they wanted. On this last point, it should be pointed out that Native Americans do not talk about dreams, but rather about visions. The idea behind the making of our Dakota dream catcher echoes this Native American position on dreams. Like the Anaba dream catch, it remains sober. However, the dream catch always serves to ensure the transmission of good dreams to its recipient when he is asleep. Bad dreams are doomed to become prisoners of the web. They can thus be consumed by the sun's rays at dawn. It should also be noted that Native Americans do not necessarily see bad dreams like nightmares. The visions that can create terror in a given person while they are sleeping correspond to the definition of a nightmare. Bad dreams, on the other hand, refer to any vision that would be of no use to the dreamer. This Dakota dream catcher, like any other dreamcatcher, however, protects you from bad dreams like nightmares.

Dakota dream catcher: Hand-made with natural materials

The Native Americans didn't really have sophisticated means when they made the first dream catches. They found all the resources they needed for their daily lives in nature. They also had an admirable technique for creating all kinds of objects. The dream catchers, in their original concept, were, in this case, handmade creations. Their concept is very similar to that of snowshoes used to walk in the snow. First of all, there is a hoop made of willow wood that is bent to form a perfect circle. This perfect circle shape is very important because it is supposed to symbolize the circle of life. There are also canvas ropes made from plant fibers and animal sinew. For this model or for another more colorful one (brown dream catcher, light blue Wapi dream catcher...), there are always ornaments like feathers, pearls and animal bones. Each element of the dreamcatcher has a particular meaning for the effect it is supposed to have. The hoop is made from red willow because this wood symbolizes love for the Native Americans. The canvas must have at least seven dots to represent the seven main principles of Native American culture. Ornaments are recurring objects in Amerindian rituals. Feathers, in particular, have considerable symbolism in Native American culture. In particular, they have the same value for them as a national flag for the nation concerned. In addition, feathers act as a cushion for good dreams as part of a dream catcher. They allow good dreams to gently descend from the canvas to the sleeper. On this Dakota dream catcher, the feathers are painted black, like those of a crow. In Native American beliefs, this symbolizes balance, resilience, mischief, and experience. Beads can have two different functions in the symbolism of an item such as our Dakota dream catcher. One of the dream catcher beads is placed in the center of the web to symbolize a spider. More precisely, it is a representation of the protective spirit behind this object. For the Amerindian tribe of the Ojibwe, this protective entity is Asibikaashi, the 'spider-woman'. For members of the Lakota tribe of North and South Dakota, it is the spiritual leader Iktomi. The other beads of the dream catchers are supposed to represent bad dreams. This is at least the case when the beads in question are placed on the dream catcher's web. The beads placed in front of the feather tips of a dream catcher are only decorative. The dream catcher in black lace has several of these decorative beads on each of the feathers. Animal bones are very common on ritual objects and Native American amulets. However, they are less used on modern products such as this Dakota dream catcher for the protection of animals. The bones bring an additional symbolism to the dream catcher according to the chosen animal. This choice is defined according to the sex and the personality of the individual.

Dream catcher Dakota: Embroidered lace canvas and uniform black

The dream catcher Dakota has a full black design. Black is a very powerful color among the Amerindians. It is a symbol of strength, aggressiveness, power, and success. This is why Amerindian warriors often wear black on their faces when they go to war. Black is also used to symbolize victory.

Dream Catcher
Dakota

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    The dreamcatchers are as much fetish objects as they are decorative items. Invented by the Amerindians even before the arrival of the settlers, the dreamcatcher is today a worldwide success, especially among Westerners.

    Using a dream catcher to dream usefully

    Native Americans are fascinating in their culture. Their belief is based on the power of nature and the cycle of life. People outside their milieu would see it as a form of mysticism and magic. However, these North American natives saw it as a true way of life. In particular, the Native American tribes established beliefs about concepts that were seemingly insignificant to many people. One of the first and most important of these is that of dreams. The interest that the Amerindians had in dreams went beyond fascination. These indigenous peoples of America based their entire existence concretely around dreams. They looked for guidance in their daily lives in order to carry out a variety of tasks. These included hunting, farming, exploring the land and even waging war. Dreams in the reasoning of the Native American tribes thus had a value of utility. Anyone could dream and make useful interpretations of their daily life. The most difficult decisions, however, required more enlightened dreams, especially those of the tribe's spiritual leader. The Native Americans were so eager to find answers in their dreams that they could use drastic means to do so. Many of them used psychotropic drugs to make sure they got the visions they wanted. On this last point, it should be pointed out that Native Americans do not talk about dreams, but rather about visions. The idea behind the making of our Dakota dream catcher echoes this Native American position on dreams. Like the Anaba dream catch, it remains sober. However, the dream catch always serves to ensure the transmission of good dreams to its recipient when he is asleep. Bad dreams are doomed to become prisoners of the web. They can thus be consumed by the sun's rays at dawn. It should also be noted that Native Americans do not necessarily see bad dreams like nightmares. The visions that can create terror in a given person while they are sleeping correspond to the definition of a nightmare. Bad dreams, on the other hand, refer to any vision that would be of no use to the dreamer. This Dakota dream catcher, like any other dreamcatcher, however, protects you from bad dreams like nightmares.

    Dakota dream catcher: Hand-made with natural materials

    The Native Americans didn't really have sophisticated means when they made the first dream catches. They found all the resources they needed for their daily lives in nature. They also had an admirable technique for creating all kinds of objects. The dream catchers, in their original concept, were, in this case, handmade creations. Their concept is very similar to that of snowshoes used to walk in the snow. First of all, there is a hoop made of willow wood that is bent to form a perfect circle. This perfect circle shape is very important because it is supposed to symbolize the circle of life. There are also canvas ropes made from plant fibers and animal sinew. For this model or for another more colorful one (brown dream catcher, light blue Wapi dream catcher...), there are always ornaments like feathers, pearls and animal bones. Each element of the dreamcatcher has a particular meaning for the effect it is supposed to have. The hoop is made from red willow because this wood symbolizes love for the Native Americans. The canvas must have at least seven dots to represent the seven main principles of Native American culture. Ornaments are recurring objects in Amerindian rituals. Feathers, in particular, have considerable symbolism in Native American culture. In particular, they have the same value for them as a national flag for the nation concerned. In addition, feathers act as a cushion for good dreams as part of a dream catcher. They allow good dreams to gently descend from the canvas to the sleeper. On this Dakota dream catcher, the feathers are painted black, like those of a crow. In Native American beliefs, this symbolizes balance, resilience, mischief, and experience. Beads can have two different functions in the symbolism of an item such as our Dakota dream catcher. One of the dream catcher beads is placed in the center of the web to symbolize a spider. More precisely, it is a representation of the protective spirit behind this object. For the Amerindian tribe of the Ojibwe, this protective entity is Asibikaashi, the 'spider-woman'. For members of the Lakota tribe of North and South Dakota, it is the spiritual leader Iktomi. The other beads of the dream catchers are supposed to represent bad dreams. This is at least the case when the beads in question are placed on the dream catcher's web. The beads placed in front of the feather tips of a dream catcher are only decorative. The dream catcher in black lace has several of these decorative beads on each of the feathers. Animal bones are very common on ritual objects and Native American amulets. However, they are less used on modern products such as this Dakota dream catcher for the protection of animals. The bones bring an additional symbolism to the dream catcher according to the chosen animal. This choice is defined according to the sex and the personality of the individual.

    Dream catcher Dakota: Embroidered lace canvas and uniform black

    The dream catcher Dakota has a full black design. Black is a very powerful color among the Amerindians. It is a symbol of strength, aggressiveness, power, and success. This is why Amerindian warriors often wear black on their faces when they go to war. Black is also used to symbolize victory.