From the perspective of trendy objects, dream catchers currently exist in various forms. Some people wear them as tattoo motifs, others wear them as costume jewelry or luxury items. Others take a more traditional approach by taking them in the form of a magical amulet, as is the case with our blue wapi dream catcher.

Sharing the concept with westerners with Frances Densmore

Blue and brown Naya dream catcher or blue Wapi dream catcher, historians on all sides have a great deal of discussion about the exact origin of dream catchers. Most expert opinions tend towards the idea that these objects were originally made by the Ojibwe tribes. Most of the information provided on this subject also tend to provide the same answer. However, there is more than one legend about dreamcatchers. The attribution of the origin of dream catchers to the Ojibwe is mainly the result of research conducted by Frances Densmore in the 19th century. Few historians have had the will to work as hard as Densmore to preserve Native American culture and history. Born in Redwing, Minnesota, Frances Densmore grew up listening to the ritual drums of Native American tribes established on neighboring journeys. Her mother encouraged her to love the purity of Native American music. Frances Densmore studied at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and Harvard University in the late 19th century. She also studied for several years with Alice Cunningham Fletcher, the author of 'A Study of Omaha Music'. She then devoted much of her life to preserving the customs and culture of Native American tribes. Her first practical education in Native American life began with a visit to an Ojibwe village in Minnesota in 1905. Among other things, she had insisted that the Smithsonian Institute's Office of Ethnology provide her with financial assistance to continue her Native American studies. This helped to forge an alliance between the Ojibwe and the Smithsonian Institute until the death of Frances Densmore in 1957. In her 1979 book 'Chippewa Customs', Densmore discusses articles such as this blue wapi dream catch. She describes them as representations of cobwebs, among other things. Anything that was potentially dangerous was trapped in the web, protecting the energies of those who slept in it. The tool in question was mainly used for young children.

Catch Blue Wapi Reve: Prophetic Object of the Rebirth of the Ojibwe People

The Ojibwe made many handicrafts from the resources at their disposal. Most of them had a meaning that needed to be understood while weaving the dream catchers. Some of them, including the original dream catchers, related to ancient prophetic legends. One of them was the prophecy of the Seven Fires of the Anishinabe or First Peoples. The story of the Seven Fires is rooted in Ojibwe's custom. In particular, they should be told and meditated upon as objects such as our blue wapi dream catch or our orange Sakari dream catch were made. The story also evokes that the seven prophets arrived on the Atlantic coast of the United States to meet the Anishinabe. When the seven prophets arrived many years ago, all was well for the land. The prophets then gave the people seven prophecies that became known as the Seven Fires. These prophecies included the changes that would happen to the earth in the coming years. They included the many movements that would be needed to continue to sustain life. There was also and especially the arrival of a race of people who would diminish the Anishinabe. One of the things the prophets advised was that the Anishinabe should be cautious in dealing with people. The prophecies also established that the Anishinabe would be driven from their lands and homes by the palefaces. They went on to mention the possible destruction that would come to the land. From this destruction, the New People would be born and would seek to perpetuate the voice of the ancestors. This would be the idea of the cycle of life, as expressed with the sacred amulet of the dream catcher.

Wapi Dream Catcher: A concept shared across Native American tribes

The dream catcher tradition has spread to other Native American nations such as the Cherokee and Lakota. Each had a version of the legend and conceptual approaches that were unique to them. Cherokee dream catchers have a more elaborate design that places great emphasis on numerology. This can be seen, for example, in the creation of nested circles. The modern formats of our blue wapi dream catcher feature many beads and feathers for decorative effect. They can also be made with a width of 15 to 30 cm. This blue wapi dream catcher is 26 cm wide and 54 cm long. It is decorated with blue and gray feathers, shiny beads of the same color and shells. In a style similar to the Ozalee dream catcher pink model, our blue wapi dream catcher is uniformly blue. This color symbolizes the intuition of serving and teaching in Native American culture. However, the interpretation of colors varies according to the tribe concerned. The Cherokee see blue as a representation of the North. It refers to the cold, defeat and problems. Blue can also be more generally associated with water, which expresses wisdom and a sense of self-sacrifice.

Wapi catches dreams: Preserving Native American culture from cultural appropriation

The affirmation of the authenticity of a blue wapi dream catcher implies respect for the history of their manufacture. The legend around the original models mentions materials such as willow and sinew or nettle. Dream catchers must also be made with the unique imprint of a person. They must never be represented as a true Native American artifact unless they were actually made by a Native American. In the United States, a 1990 law protects Native Americans from acts of appropriation of their culture. This law prohibits anyone from asserting the authenticity of a dream catch if it is not Native American-made. This is all the more understandable since dream catchers are much more than beautiful works of art. They have a deeper meaning that goes back to ancient Native American prophecies and a certain healing power.

Dream Catcher
Blue Wapi

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    From the perspective of trendy objects, dream catchers currently exist in various forms. Some people wear them as tattoo motifs, others wear them as costume jewelry or luxury items. Others take a more traditional approach by taking them in the form of a magical amulet, as is the case with our blue wapi dream catcher.

    Sharing the concept with westerners with Frances Densmore

    Blue and brown Naya dream catcher or blue Wapi dream catcher, historians on all sides have a great deal of discussion about the exact origin of dream catchers. Most expert opinions tend towards the idea that these objects were originally made by the Ojibwe tribes. Most of the information provided on this subject also tend to provide the same answer. However, there is more than one legend about dreamcatchers. The attribution of the origin of dream catchers to the Ojibwe is mainly the result of research conducted by Frances Densmore in the 19th century. Few historians have had the will to work as hard as Densmore to preserve Native American culture and history. Born in Redwing, Minnesota, Frances Densmore grew up listening to the ritual drums of Native American tribes established on neighboring journeys. Her mother encouraged her to love the purity of Native American music. Frances Densmore studied at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and Harvard University in the late 19th century. She also studied for several years with Alice Cunningham Fletcher, the author of 'A Study of Omaha Music'. She then devoted much of her life to preserving the customs and culture of Native American tribes. Her first practical education in Native American life began with a visit to an Ojibwe village in Minnesota in 1905. Among other things, she had insisted that the Smithsonian Institute's Office of Ethnology provide her with financial assistance to continue her Native American studies. This helped to forge an alliance between the Ojibwe and the Smithsonian Institute until the death of Frances Densmore in 1957. In her 1979 book 'Chippewa Customs', Densmore discusses articles such as this blue wapi dream catch. She describes them as representations of cobwebs, among other things. Anything that was potentially dangerous was trapped in the web, protecting the energies of those who slept in it. The tool in question was mainly used for young children.

    Catch Blue Wapi Reve: Prophetic Object of the Rebirth of the Ojibwe People

    The Ojibwe made many handicrafts from the resources at their disposal. Most of them had a meaning that needed to be understood while weaving the dream catchers. Some of them, including the original dream catchers, related to ancient prophetic legends. One of them was the prophecy of the Seven Fires of the Anishinabe or First Peoples. The story of the Seven Fires is rooted in Ojibwe's custom. In particular, they should be told and meditated upon as objects such as our blue wapi dream catch or our orange Sakari dream catch were made. The story also evokes that the seven prophets arrived on the Atlantic coast of the United States to meet the Anishinabe. When the seven prophets arrived many years ago, all was well for the land. The prophets then gave the people seven prophecies that became known as the Seven Fires. These prophecies included the changes that would happen to the earth in the coming years. They included the many movements that would be needed to continue to sustain life. There was also and especially the arrival of a race of people who would diminish the Anishinabe. One of the things the prophets advised was that the Anishinabe should be cautious in dealing with people. The prophecies also established that the Anishinabe would be driven from their lands and homes by the palefaces. They went on to mention the possible destruction that would come to the land. From this destruction, the New People would be born and would seek to perpetuate the voice of the ancestors. This would be the idea of the cycle of life, as expressed with the sacred amulet of the dream catcher.

    Wapi Dream Catcher: A concept shared across Native American tribes

    The dream catcher tradition has spread to other Native American nations such as the Cherokee and Lakota. Each had a version of the legend and conceptual approaches that were unique to them. Cherokee dream catchers have a more elaborate design that places great emphasis on numerology. This can be seen, for example, in the creation of nested circles. The modern formats of our blue wapi dream catcher feature many beads and feathers for decorative effect. They can also be made with a width of 15 to 30 cm. This blue wapi dream catcher is 26 cm wide and 54 cm long. It is decorated with blue and gray feathers, shiny beads of the same color and shells. In a style similar to the Ozalee dream catcher pink model, our blue wapi dream catcher is uniformly blue. This color symbolizes the intuition of serving and teaching in Native American culture. However, the interpretation of colors varies according to the tribe concerned. The Cherokee see blue as a representation of the North. It refers to the cold, defeat and problems. Blue can also be more generally associated with water, which expresses wisdom and a sense of self-sacrifice.

    Wapi catches dreams: Preserving Native American culture from cultural appropriation

    The affirmation of the authenticity of a blue wapi dream catcher implies respect for the history of their manufacture. The legend around the original models mentions materials such as willow and sinew or nettle. Dream catchers must also be made with the unique imprint of a person. They must never be represented as a true Native American artifact unless they were actually made by a Native American. In the United States, a 1990 law protects Native Americans from acts of appropriation of their culture. This law prohibits anyone from asserting the authenticity of a dream catch if it is not Native American-made. This is all the more understandable since dream catchers are much more than beautiful works of art. They have a deeper meaning that goes back to ancient Native American prophecies and a certain healing power.