Amerindian culture is a clever mix between the force of nature and respect for ancestors. These two concepts are found in all their creations, especially in the dream catcher. Our bamboo dream catcher also has a natural and handcrafted look because of the material it is made of.

Maternal dream catcher and the myth of Asibikaashi

In Ojibwe culture, dreams have many functions. The Ojibwe people believe that dreams can provide strength and spiritual guidance to help them in their personal lives. They also believe that dreams can show them future events that will affect tribes or individuals. Ojibwe often make charms to represent the symbols shown to them in their dreams. They carry these charms throughout their lives and into the afterlife. The hand-made dream catcher is part of the concept of this type of charm. Legend has it that an old Ojibwe woman watched a spider daily weave a web above her bed. One day, her grandson saw the spider and wanted to kill it. The Ojibwe grandmother immediately ordered him not to do so. The young boy respected the order given by his grandmother, although he was surprised by such a decision'. When the grandson was gone, the spider thanked the old woman and promised to weave a web for her. The web would be hung between the old woman and the moon, among other things. This would protect the grandmother's sleep from all kinds of bad thoughts. The myth of the benevolent spider and the old woman who had spared her gradually coalesced to create Asibikaashi. The web intended to protect the old woman's sleep is the very first dream catcher. Asibikaashi used it in particular for the protection of the Ojibwe on their ancestral land, namely Turtle Island. However, the situation became more complicated for Asibikaashi when the Ojibwe decided to venture outside Turtle Island. She was able to protect them as long as they stayed on the island. To deal with this situation, Asibikaashi taught Ojibwe mothers and grandmothers how to make protective cloth. These protective cloths include the dream catcher, such as our bamboo dream catcher.

Redesign of the myth of the bamboo dream catcher by the Lakota Native Americans

After the Ojibwe, the concept of this bamboo dream catcher has been adopted by other Amerindian tribes and is greatly inspired by the natural tree dream catcher. One of these tribes has even established its own legend around dream catchers. This is the Lakota tribe, originally established in what is now North and South Dakota. The message translated through the Lakota version of the dream catcher myth is similar to that of the Ojibwe. The story also mentions a mystical entity associated with a spider. This entity, however, takes the name of Iktomi in the Lakota culture. The story begins on a high mountain where the Lakota spiritual leader had a vision. In the vision, a great sage disguised as a spider came to speak to him in a language described as sacred. The great sage spoke with the spiritual leader while weaving a web in the middle of his earrings. The earrings were already decorated with feathers and pearls. The discussion between the great sage and the spiritual leader revolved around the cycle of life. The discussion between the great sage and the spiritual leader revolved around the cycle of life. She also related the good and evil forces that existed in this world. These forces could be useful or harmful. When the spider had finished spinning its web, he gave it to the spiritual leader. He told him to use it to bring good forces into people's lives. In particular, the web should let good ideas pass through and catch the bad ones to trap and destroy them'.

Dream catcher bamboo: A balance of strengths and respect for elders

Bamboo is the most popular plant in China. Every village in southern China is surrounded by bamboos. The falling bamboo leaves cross each other as if they make up the Chinese character 'An' (quiet). Wandering travelers often add a bamboo leaf to their letter to indicate that they are well. In the order of the Four Gentlemen (the seasons of the year), bamboo represents the spirit of summer. It is also seen as a man of perfect virtues. Bamboo combines vertical integrity with accommodating flexibility. It is the perfect balance between grace and strength or Yin and Yang. Bamboo also personifies a life of simplicity. It produces neither flowers nor fruit. The hollow trunk also reminds the Chinese of the value of humility. Like our bamboo dream catcher, bamboo also reflects the value of respect for elders. The young branches at the top of the bamboo trunk do not grow at the same angle as the older branches. This leaves the sunlight to their elders. When the young shoots emerge from the roots, they are in the shade of the older bamboo branches.

dream catcher bamboo of handcrafted and sustainable design

The making of an amulet like the Ojibwe bamboo dream catcher is very artisanal. They tie threads of nerves in a cloth around a round or teardrop-shaped willow frame. This method is much the same as the one they use to make snowshoe straps. The resulting dream catcher is hung above the bed. It is used as a charm to protect sleeping children from nightmares. Since dream catchers are made of willow and sinew, they are not meant to last forever. They dry out and disintegrate as the child enters the age of wonder. Modern designs, such as the bamboo dream catcher, however, are more durable.

Natural bamboo dream catcher and peacock feathers

Our bamboo dream catcher is a wonderful expression of the artisanal spirit of dream catcher making. This is immediately apparent in its natural bamboo frame and the beads that adorn the cords. The long beads, which are also found in the same style as the white Cherokee dream catcher, are subtly decorated with hand-carved shamanic motifs. The bamboo dream catcher also plays the card of a neat aesthetic. The center of the canvas features a Lotus flower motif with strings of chains. Peacock feathers also hang on the sides of the bamboo dream catcher.

Dream Catcher
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    Amerindian culture is a clever mix between the force of nature and respect for ancestors. These two concepts are found in all their creations, especially in the dream catcher. Our bamboo dream catcher also has a natural and handcrafted look because of the material it is made of.

    Maternal dream catcher and the myth of Asibikaashi

    In Ojibwe culture, dreams have many functions. The Ojibwe people believe that dreams can provide strength and spiritual guidance to help them in their personal lives. They also believe that dreams can show them future events that will affect tribes or individuals. Ojibwe often make charms to represent the symbols shown to them in their dreams. They carry these charms throughout their lives and into the afterlife. The hand-made dream catcher is part of the concept of this type of charm. Legend has it that an old Ojibwe woman watched a spider daily weave a web above her bed. One day, her grandson saw the spider and wanted to kill it. The Ojibwe grandmother immediately ordered him not to do so. The young boy respected the order given by his grandmother, although he was surprised by such a decision'. When the grandson was gone, the spider thanked the old woman and promised to weave a web for her. The web would be hung between the old woman and the moon, among other things. This would protect the grandmother's sleep from all kinds of bad thoughts. The myth of the benevolent spider and the old woman who had spared her gradually coalesced to create Asibikaashi. The web intended to protect the old woman's sleep is the very first dream catcher. Asibikaashi used it in particular for the protection of the Ojibwe on their ancestral land, namely Turtle Island. However, the situation became more complicated for Asibikaashi when the Ojibwe decided to venture outside Turtle Island. She was able to protect them as long as they stayed on the island. To deal with this situation, Asibikaashi taught Ojibwe mothers and grandmothers how to make protective cloth. These protective cloths include the dream catcher, such as our bamboo dream catcher.

    Redesign of the myth of the bamboo dream catcher by the Lakota Native Americans

    After the Ojibwe, the concept of this bamboo dream catcher has been adopted by other Amerindian tribes and is greatly inspired by the natural tree dream catcher. One of these tribes has even established its own legend around dream catchers. This is the Lakota tribe, originally established in what is now North and South Dakota. The message translated through the Lakota version of the dream catcher myth is similar to that of the Ojibwe. The story also mentions a mystical entity associated with a spider. This entity, however, takes the name of Iktomi in the Lakota culture. The story begins on a high mountain where the Lakota spiritual leader had a vision. In the vision, a great sage disguised as a spider came to speak to him in a language described as sacred. The great sage spoke with the spiritual leader while weaving a web in the middle of his earrings. The earrings were already decorated with feathers and pearls. The discussion between the great sage and the spiritual leader revolved around the cycle of life. The discussion between the great sage and the spiritual leader revolved around the cycle of life. She also related the good and evil forces that existed in this world. These forces could be useful or harmful. When the spider had finished spinning its web, he gave it to the spiritual leader. He told him to use it to bring good forces into people's lives. In particular, the web should let good ideas pass through and catch the bad ones to trap and destroy them'.

    Dream catcher bamboo: A balance of strengths and respect for elders

    Bamboo is the most popular plant in China. Every village in southern China is surrounded by bamboos. The falling bamboo leaves cross each other as if they make up the Chinese character 'An' (quiet). Wandering travelers often add a bamboo leaf to their letter to indicate that they are well. In the order of the Four Gentlemen (the seasons of the year), bamboo represents the spirit of summer. It is also seen as a man of perfect virtues. Bamboo combines vertical integrity with accommodating flexibility. It is the perfect balance between grace and strength or Yin and Yang. Bamboo also personifies a life of simplicity. It produces neither flowers nor fruit. The hollow trunk also reminds the Chinese of the value of humility. Like our bamboo dream catcher, bamboo also reflects the value of respect for elders. The young branches at the top of the bamboo trunk do not grow at the same angle as the older branches. This leaves the sunlight to their elders. When the young shoots emerge from the roots, they are in the shade of the older bamboo branches.

    dream catcher bamboo of handcrafted and sustainable design

    The making of an amulet like the Ojibwe bamboo dream catcher is very artisanal. They tie threads of nerves in a cloth around a round or teardrop-shaped willow frame. This method is much the same as the one they use to make snowshoe straps. The resulting dream catcher is hung above the bed. It is used as a charm to protect sleeping children from nightmares. Since dream catchers are made of willow and sinew, they are not meant to last forever. They dry out and disintegrate as the child enters the age of wonder. Modern designs, such as the bamboo dream catcher, however, are more durable.

    Natural bamboo dream catcher and peacock feathers

    Our bamboo dream catcher is a wonderful expression of the artisanal spirit of dream catcher making. This is immediately apparent in its natural bamboo frame and the beads that adorn the cords. The long beads, which are also found in the same style as the white Cherokee dream catcher, are subtly decorated with hand-carved shamanic motifs. The bamboo dream catcher also plays the card of a neat aesthetic. The center of the canvas features a Lotus flower motif with strings of chains. Peacock feathers also hang on the sides of the bamboo dream catcher.