The Dream Catcher has quickly evolved from a sacred object of Native American culture to a phenomenon. Popularized by the New-Age movement, this magical amulet is now present in many Western homes. From handmade creations to commercial models such as our dream Ayani catcher, our black and brown Anoki dream catcher... there is something for everyone.

Cultural phenomenon originating from the Ojibwe tribe

The Amerindian culture is quite old since it largely precedes the arrival of the first settlers in America. Certain aspects of this culture have remained in the tradition of the Amerindians. Others, on the other hand, have been shared or borrowed by Westerners. L'attrape rêve is, in principle, the most significant example of this sharing of Amerindian culture. Dream catchers were not originally intended to be used by people other than the Amerindians. In fact, they were originally specifically defined for the Ojibwe tribe. This is due to the legendary story of Asibikaashi, the famous 'spider-woman'. According to Ojibwe beliefs, Asibikaashi was the great protector of all members of this tribe. Her protection was exercised particularly within the limits of the ancestral lands of the Ojibwe tribe. However, the Ojibwe decided to extend their territory even further into Central America. Asibikaashi was then in difficulty with regard to the prospect of ensuring their full protection. The 'spider woman' had nevertheless passed on important knowledge to the spiritual leader of the Ojibwe. This was the web of life with which she had always protected them. The women of the Ojibwe tribe were the heirs of Asibikaashi's power. As such, they too worked to create webs of life to protect their fellow man. This is where the idea of creating a dream catcher came from.

Dream catcher Ayani: Handcrafted with natural materials.

It should be noted that the dream catcher or 'Asubakatchin' in the language of the Amerindians was original of a very artisanal conception. Ojibwe women made dream catchers with everything they could find in nature. These amulets can thus take on all the mystical power of nature while remaining specific to a given person. The hoop was made from a willow branch that was bent into a perfect circle. The ropes were made from various plant fibers. The dream catcher was also decorated with various elements such as feathers, beads and animal bones. This artisanal approach is still maintained to this day by current generations of Ojibwe Native Americans. Many of them make, among other things, handcrafted dream catchers to sell to people of other cultures. These Indian dream catchers are also generally made on a small scale, which brings a new side to each model. As with these authentic Native American dream catchers, our dream catcher Ayani is also made using artisanal methods. This model, like the handcrafted Ozalee Rose dream catcher, is also produced in small quantities, which increases the originality of each model. If you are looking for a dream catcher that is the closest to a Native American product, this dream catcher Ayani will satisfy you.

Dream Catcher Ayani: A gentle approach to sleeping peacefully

For many Amerindians, past and present, dreams are guides for the living. They have a great belief in the effectiveness of dreams and the power of the messages they contain. In particular, dreams are seen as a means of maintaining physical health and predicting the future. It is also seen as a way to find answers to personal questions and to contact the Great Spirit. Some Native American tribes believed so faithfully in the prophecy of dreams that they interpreted literally everything they could see in them. For example, some of them would go to a shaman for a remedy after being hurt in their dreams. Other tribes even based their lives on the interpretation of their dreams. They would look for an indication of the right conditions to hunt, fish, trade or go to war. This was at least the case for the Mohaves Indians of Arizona and California and the Iroquois of New York. Dreams were so sacred to the Native Americans that they used every means to get them the way they wanted them. Entire ceremonies were built around the glorification of sleep. Some deprived themselves of food and drink and stimulated their bodies with pain and endurance to ensure their dreams. Others also used hallucinogenic herbs such as Mescal from the Peyote cactus. Today, the consumption of hallucinogenic plants is illegal. There is a less radical way to ensure the quality of dreams and that is the dream catcher. While it is primarily intended for infants, the dream catcher can be used by people of all ages. The dream catcher Ayani works in practice as a kind of filter for dreams of all kinds. Good dreams pass through the hole of this amulet and come down to you through the feathers. Bad dreams get trapped in the web and are burned by the sun at dawn. Dream catchers also make excellent decorative objects with their special geometry and New Age style. The dream catcher Ayani comes in a beautiful assortment of colors to give your decor more effect.

Dream catcher Ayani: An inspiring design for interior decoration

Choosing a dream catcher is not a very complex process from a functional point of view. Indeed, these objects fulfill the same function regardless of their concept. The most notable differentiation criterion for dream catchers is mainly defined by an aesthetic aspect. Some models may be more suited to your style of decoration than others.

Dream Catcher
Ayani

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    The Dream Catcher has quickly evolved from a sacred object of Native American culture to a phenomenon. Popularized by the New-Age movement, this magical amulet is now present in many Western homes. From handmade creations to commercial models such as our dream Ayani catcher, our black and brown Anoki dream catcher... there is something for everyone.

    Cultural phenomenon originating from the Ojibwe tribe

    The Amerindian culture is quite old since it largely precedes the arrival of the first settlers in America. Certain aspects of this culture have remained in the tradition of the Amerindians. Others, on the other hand, have been shared or borrowed by Westerners. L'attrape rêve is, in principle, the most significant example of this sharing of Amerindian culture. Dream catchers were not originally intended to be used by people other than the Amerindians. In fact, they were originally specifically defined for the Ojibwe tribe. This is due to the legendary story of Asibikaashi, the famous 'spider-woman'. According to Ojibwe beliefs, Asibikaashi was the great protector of all members of this tribe. Her protection was exercised particularly within the limits of the ancestral lands of the Ojibwe tribe. However, the Ojibwe decided to extend their territory even further into Central America. Asibikaashi was then in difficulty with regard to the prospect of ensuring their full protection. The 'spider woman' had nevertheless passed on important knowledge to the spiritual leader of the Ojibwe. This was the web of life with which she had always protected them. The women of the Ojibwe tribe were the heirs of Asibikaashi's power. As such, they too worked to create webs of life to protect their fellow man. This is where the idea of creating a dream catcher came from.

    Dream catcher Ayani: Handcrafted with natural materials.

    It should be noted that the dream catcher or 'Asubakatchin' in the language of the Amerindians was original of a very artisanal conception. Ojibwe women made dream catchers with everything they could find in nature. These amulets can thus take on all the mystical power of nature while remaining specific to a given person. The hoop was made from a willow branch that was bent into a perfect circle. The ropes were made from various plant fibers. The dream catcher was also decorated with various elements such as feathers, beads and animal bones. This artisanal approach is still maintained to this day by current generations of Ojibwe Native Americans. Many of them make, among other things, handcrafted dream catchers to sell to people of other cultures. These Indian dream catchers are also generally made on a small scale, which brings a new side to each model. As with these authentic Native American dream catchers, our dream catcher Ayani is also made using artisanal methods. This model, like the handcrafted Ozalee Rose dream catcher, is also produced in small quantities, which increases the originality of each model. If you are looking for a dream catcher that is the closest to a Native American product, this dream catcher Ayani will satisfy you.

    Dream Catcher Ayani: A gentle approach to sleeping peacefully

    For many Amerindians, past and present, dreams are guides for the living. They have a great belief in the effectiveness of dreams and the power of the messages they contain. In particular, dreams are seen as a means of maintaining physical health and predicting the future. It is also seen as a way to find answers to personal questions and to contact the Great Spirit. Some Native American tribes believed so faithfully in the prophecy of dreams that they interpreted literally everything they could see in them. For example, some of them would go to a shaman for a remedy after being hurt in their dreams. Other tribes even based their lives on the interpretation of their dreams. They would look for an indication of the right conditions to hunt, fish, trade or go to war. This was at least the case for the Mohaves Indians of Arizona and California and the Iroquois of New York. Dreams were so sacred to the Native Americans that they used every means to get them the way they wanted them. Entire ceremonies were built around the glorification of sleep. Some deprived themselves of food and drink and stimulated their bodies with pain and endurance to ensure their dreams. Others also used hallucinogenic herbs such as Mescal from the Peyote cactus. Today, the consumption of hallucinogenic plants is illegal. There is a less radical way to ensure the quality of dreams and that is the dream catcher. While it is primarily intended for infants, the dream catcher can be used by people of all ages. The dream catcher Ayani works in practice as a kind of filter for dreams of all kinds. Good dreams pass through the hole of this amulet and come down to you through the feathers. Bad dreams get trapped in the web and are burned by the sun at dawn. Dream catchers also make excellent decorative objects with their special geometry and New Age style. The dream catcher Ayani comes in a beautiful assortment of colors to give your decor more effect.

    Dream catcher Ayani: An inspiring design for interior decoration

    Choosing a dream catcher is not a very complex process from a functional point of view. Indeed, these objects fulfill the same function regardless of their concept. The most notable differentiation criterion for dream catchers is mainly defined by an aesthetic aspect. Some models may be more suited to your style of decoration than others.