The dream catcher is a kind of amulet originally made by the Great Plains Amerindians. This decorative object with magical attributes is currently a great success worldwide. This dream catcher takes up the symbolism specific to the Amerindian dream catchers while being in line with a trendy object.

Alawa Dream catcher: A catalyst of positive waves for sleep serenity

The dream catchers originally came from the Ojibwe people, a group of indigenous people in North America. The legend of the catcher of dreams is based on the legend of Asibikaashi, the famous 'spider-woman' of Native American beliefs. Asibikaashi is a mystical entity that devotes her existence to the maintenance of the children and the Ojibwe people on their land. Nevertheless, like any other Native American tribe at the time, the Ojibwe had the ambition to conquer other lands in North America. This desire to expand their territory posed a problem for Asibikaashi, who could only protect them in the extent of their ancestral lands. Asibikaashi then unveiled the first catcher of dreams in a vision she had passed on to the Ojibwe spiritual leader. The latter in turn passed on the wisdom of the 'spider-woman' to the women of the Ojibwe tribe. The women of the Ojibwe tribe were also able to make their own dream catchers. The Ojibwe hung dream catchers above the bed like a charm to protect sleeping people from nightmares. Dream catchers are most often used for children, but could also be used at any age. The dream catcher also helps to protect a person from bad luck when he or she embarks on a new adventure. Whether it's a dream catcher or a colorful Abequa dream catcher, they are all an iconic aspect of Native American culture around the world. They have a certain similarity with the 'Torans' in India. The Torans are hung at the entrance of the house to call for abundance and positive energies.

Dream catcher Alawa: An original Native American manufacture

The whole concept of the dream catcher also tends to represent the customs of the Amerindians. This concerns both the materials used and the arrangement of the different elements of the amulet. The original Amerindian dream catcher was handcrafted from natural materials. The hoop is made with willow branches. The sinew or rope needed for the cloth was made from plants. The canvas was then decorated with sacred objects from the Amerindian custom. These included feathers and beads, which also symbolized unity among the different Indian nations. The shape of the dream catcher is specially designed to be a perfect circle. It is a representation of the daily cycle of the sun and moon across the sky. Other Native Americans design dream catcher hoops with a river reed or wood from the individual's guardian tree. In this case, the material chosen for the interior was often animal skin. They would add various ornaments to the interior canvas if they could afford it. It was mostly about creating something special for the owner of the dream catcher. Dream catchers are always supposed to be given as a gift to someone. They should not be acquired intentionally. Sometimes it is even made to have something of importance to the person who made it. This can be a piece of bone or a tooth.

Alawa Dream catcher: The Authentic Look of a Handcrafted Dream catcher

The dream catcher has undergone a number of important changes over the generations. The original design suggested a canvas and hanging feathers. The canvas filtered out bad dreams while the feathers directed good dreams to the owner of the dream catcher. Dream catchers became popular over time beyond Native American tribes. In particular, some companies began to manufacture them for mass profit. However, this is not the primary perspective of this object. A dream catcher should be made of products that are part of the circle of life. It should not be made from metals and artificial textiles. Each dream catcher should also have its own story and have a different meaning. Our Alawa dream catcher is more respectful of this original perspective. It does not come from a mass production line and is made of natural materials only. This applies to the composition of the hoop as well as the ropes of the canvas.

The Alawa dream catcher in black brown with the colors of the golden eagle

Handcrafted manufacturing is highly recommended to establish the authenticity of a dream catcher. This is at least true for a model to which one would have attributed the label of an authentic Amerindian product. It's a commercial model, but it is nonetheless labeled as a handcrafted product. Its entire concept has been designed to correspond to a Native American dream catcher. Initially, the Alawa Dream Catcher surprises by its layout. This model has indeed a large hoop in which is nested a small hoop off-center on the right. A pearl is placed at the very center of the canvas of the small inner hoop. The contrast created by the pattern of the canvases is accentuated by the black color of the bands covering the hoops. This Alawa dream catcher is enhanced by a play of color in black and brown. This subtle mix of nuances is seen in the shiny wooden beads. The choice of colors also embellishes the dreamcatcher's feathers, which seem to diffuse the energy of a golden eagle. The fact that it has two circles also makes it an appropriate gift to celebrate the bond between two people. It would be especially interesting to give it as a gift to someone very close to you. This could be a family member, spouse, intimate partner or friend.

Dream Catcher
Alawa

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    The dream catcher is a kind of amulet originally made by the Great Plains Amerindians. This decorative object with magical attributes is currently a great success worldwide. This dream catcher takes up the symbolism specific to the Amerindian dream catchers while being in line with a trendy object.

    Alawa Dream catcher: A catalyst of positive waves for sleep serenity

    The dream catchers originally came from the Ojibwe people, a group of indigenous people in North America. The legend of the catcher of dreams is based on the legend of Asibikaashi, the famous 'spider-woman' of Native American beliefs. Asibikaashi is a mystical entity that devotes her existence to the maintenance of the children and the Ojibwe people on their land. Nevertheless, like any other Native American tribe at the time, the Ojibwe had the ambition to conquer other lands in North America. This desire to expand their territory posed a problem for Asibikaashi, who could only protect them in the extent of their ancestral lands. Asibikaashi then unveiled the first catcher of dreams in a vision she had passed on to the Ojibwe spiritual leader. The latter in turn passed on the wisdom of the 'spider-woman' to the women of the Ojibwe tribe. The women of the Ojibwe tribe were also able to make their own dream catchers. The Ojibwe hung dream catchers above the bed like a charm to protect sleeping people from nightmares. Dream catchers are most often used for children, but could also be used at any age. The dream catcher also helps to protect a person from bad luck when he or she embarks on a new adventure. Whether it's a dream catcher or a colorful Abequa dream catcher, they are all an iconic aspect of Native American culture around the world. They have a certain similarity with the 'Torans' in India. The Torans are hung at the entrance of the house to call for abundance and positive energies.

    Dream catcher Alawa: An original Native American manufacture

    The whole concept of the dream catcher also tends to represent the customs of the Amerindians. This concerns both the materials used and the arrangement of the different elements of the amulet. The original Amerindian dream catcher was handcrafted from natural materials. The hoop is made with willow branches. The sinew or rope needed for the cloth was made from plants. The canvas was then decorated with sacred objects from the Amerindian custom. These included feathers and beads, which also symbolized unity among the different Indian nations. The shape of the dream catcher is specially designed to be a perfect circle. It is a representation of the daily cycle of the sun and moon across the sky. Other Native Americans design dream catcher hoops with a river reed or wood from the individual's guardian tree. In this case, the material chosen for the interior was often animal skin. They would add various ornaments to the interior canvas if they could afford it. It was mostly about creating something special for the owner of the dream catcher. Dream catchers are always supposed to be given as a gift to someone. They should not be acquired intentionally. Sometimes it is even made to have something of importance to the person who made it. This can be a piece of bone or a tooth.

    Alawa Dream catcher: The Authentic Look of a Handcrafted Dream catcher

    The dream catcher has undergone a number of important changes over the generations. The original design suggested a canvas and hanging feathers. The canvas filtered out bad dreams while the feathers directed good dreams to the owner of the dream catcher. Dream catchers became popular over time beyond Native American tribes. In particular, some companies began to manufacture them for mass profit. However, this is not the primary perspective of this object. A dream catcher should be made of products that are part of the circle of life. It should not be made from metals and artificial textiles. Each dream catcher should also have its own story and have a different meaning. Our Alawa dream catcher is more respectful of this original perspective. It does not come from a mass production line and is made of natural materials only. This applies to the composition of the hoop as well as the ropes of the canvas.

    The Alawa dream catcher in black brown with the colors of the golden eagle

    Handcrafted manufacturing is highly recommended to establish the authenticity of a dream catcher. This is at least true for a model to which one would have attributed the label of an authentic Amerindian product. It's a commercial model, but it is nonetheless labeled as a handcrafted product. Its entire concept has been designed to correspond to a Native American dream catcher. Initially, the Alawa Dream Catcher surprises by its layout. This model has indeed a large hoop in which is nested a small hoop off-center on the right. A pearl is placed at the very center of the canvas of the small inner hoop. The contrast created by the pattern of the canvases is accentuated by the black color of the bands covering the hoops. This Alawa dream catcher is enhanced by a play of color in black and brown. This subtle mix of nuances is seen in the shiny wooden beads. The choice of colors also embellishes the dreamcatcher's feathers, which seem to diffuse the energy of a golden eagle. The fact that it has two circles also makes it an appropriate gift to celebrate the bond between two people. It would be especially interesting to give it as a gift to someone very close to you. This could be a family member, spouse, intimate partner or friend.